Susann Rhoades

Broker

Home Cures That Really Work

By Barbara Pronin


If Grandma handed you a moist tea bag to take the sting out of a minor burn, she probably had no idea why it worked – but doctors at a recent community forum confirmed that the home-grown remedy may be just as effective as some over-the-counter creams.

“Soak a towel in cold tea,” confirmed Pennsylvania doctor Marie Savard, MD. “The phytonutrients will reduce inflamed blood vessels.”

The panel of medical experts put a seal of approval on seven other useful home remedies:

Mosquito bites – Crush a low-dose aspirin and dissolve it in an ounce of water. Apply the paste and the salicylic acid acts as an anti-inflammatory to reduce redness and itchiness.

Healing wounds – Reduce scarring as the wound heals by keeping it covered with petroleum jelly and a bandage for three to five days. Keeping the skin soft as it heals is better than allowing it to scab over.

Queasiness – Whether it’s motion sickness, morning sickness or a little stomach bug, try drinking the fruit syrup from a can of peaches. It works as well as some expensive over-the-counter nausea remedies, which are mostly composed of sugar.

Food poisoning – Try ingesting some black tea and a few slices of burned toast. The tannic acid in the tea and the charcoal in the toast should neutralize the toxins and soon have you feeling better.

Hangover – a cup of tomato juice mixed with a splash of Tabasco sauce will stimulate the liver and provide the antioxidants your body needs to replenish.

Congestion/bronchitis – Medicated vapor rub applied to the chest can help. Or boil a pot of water, let it cool for a minute, then pour it into a bowl and mix in a teaspoon of vapor rub to melt. Lean over it with your head about a foot from the steam. Use a towel to form a tent over your head and inhale for five minutes.

Toothaches – Cloves really work. Keep a bottle of eugenol (clove extract), purchased at the pharmacy, in your medicine cabinet. If a toothache strikes, soak a cotton ball in it and apply directly to the tooth to ease the pain until you can see a dentist. 

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2013. All rights reserved.